Tiny Home Living

The Tiny House movement has swept across Canada with more and more people, of all ages, turning to tiny living as a more affordable, sustainable housing option. There are many pros and cons to owning a tiny home, so Apartment Therapy spoke with a number of experts on the functionality, longevity and psychology behind them. Here are some of the highlights from their research:

  • "Tiny houses represent affordable luxury. One of today’s status symbols is the ability to have something special and unique, and not cookie-cutter like everyone else. Tiny houses fit snugly into this trend. They have a wow factor that even a McMansion can’t provide.” - Daniel Levine, Director of the Avant-Guide Institute and trends expert.
  • "The idea of living with only what you need is relaxing. It cuts out some of the cycle of consumerism, at least in theory...[However], you’re more vulnerable and may feel less protected. The sense of freedom may also make you feel less settled. You may feel too close for comfort in a tiny house that doesn’t have rooms and that is internally small. There’s a reason modern housing developed as it did. Tiny houses are less convenient and less common. If people actually wanted to live in tiny houses, more houses would be tiny.” - Rachel Kazez, LCSW, Therapist
  • “People often have meaningful connections to material objects and hobbies that can be difficult to incorporate into a tiny home. We really do have strong emotional attachment to objects in our lives, and divesting ourselves of those to which we are attached can truly be wrenching.” - Sally Augustin, PhD Fellow, American Psychological Association Principal, Design With Science. 

Living in a tiny home has it's benefits, such as sustainable living and financial freedom. It also has some downsides, such as confined living space and functional limitations. Tiny homes are a fun trend, but make sure it is the best long term housing situation for you before jumping in.

 

Your Real Estate Professional,

Ken Richter

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